ROBERT MACFARLANE’S LOST WORDS

Here’s how this week’s arts and culture column begins:

Robert Macfarlane (b. 1976) is an award-winning British writer on landscape, place, people, language, memory, and meaning. He’s also a Fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge.

Mountains of the Mind (2003) explores the history of mountaineering and our sometimes fatal fascination with the metaphysical dimension of precipitous, perilous terrain on which we long to be the first to place our feet or flag.

The Wild Places (2007) charts a series of journeys made in search of the ever-shrinking wildness remaining in Britain and Ireland.

The Old Ways: A Journey on Foot (2012) is a kind of elegy to one of Macfarlane’s heroes, the poet Edward Thomas (1878-1917), who was a lover of nature, a depressive, and a passionate lifelong walker, especially in and around the South Downs. The “old ways” include holloways, pilgrimage routes, cliff paths, animal passages, and ancient byways, rights-of-way, and foraging grounds in England, Scotland, Palestine, Sichuan and Palestine.

Together, the three from a loose trilogy about the “landscape and the human heart”—a subject upon which Macfarlane speaks eloquently in a 2012 IQ2 talk of that name available on YouTube.

READ THE WHOLE PIECE HERE.

4 Replies to “ROBERT MACFARLANE’S LOST WORDS

  1. Why have I not heard of this author before? I will definitely be getting his books.
    Thanks, as always, for your intriguing blog posts.

    1. HEATHER KING says: Reply

      And Macfarlane in turn leads to a whole bunch of OTHER writers! Thanks, Ellen, so much for reading and commenting.

  2. Thank You Heather for this Post. It feels like gentle reminder what is out there, and we are invited.

    1. HEATHER KING says: Reply

      Yes, Helena! That is really the whole point–an invitation to do our own exploring rather than sticking to regurgitated top 10 lists. There are worlds and worlds of film out there–obviously I have only scratched the merest surface. Everyone has their own corners they enjoy poking into…we don’t have to be film critics to deeply appreciate the art form. Film is really story-telling…I, for one, can’t get enough of it…

I WELCOME YOUR COMMENTS!