ARCOSANTI

Here’s how this week’s arts and culture piece begins:

Arcosanti has been called an “experimental city,” ” an “urban laboratory,” a “caravanserai.” 

Seventy miles north of Phoenix, the 25-acre compound, built on a 4,060-acre land preserve, rises from the desert like a mirage.

The project was the brainchild of “visionary” Paolo Soleri (1919-2013). Arcology—a concept combining architecture and ecology—was his guiding light.

Cosanti (in Italian, “against things and business”) was the name Soleri gave to his home in Paradise Valley—another 75 miles north and now a gallery, studio and shop selling ceramics and the sculptural bronze-cast windbells for which Arcosanti has come to be known.  

Ground was broken in the 1970s and building continued until 1989. The goal of the project was to combine “the social interaction and accessibility of an urban environment with sound environmental principles, such as minimal resource use and access to the natural environment.”

READ THE WHOLE PIECE HERE.

2 Replies to “ARCOSANTI”

  1. Meg GINNETTI says: Reply

    Heather,

    Is there any reaction input from the Native people who live in Soleri’s area re his architecture etc?

    Thanks

    1. HEATHER KING says: Reply

      I don’t know what Arcosanti’s relationship is with its neighbors, Meg–I do know Soleri incorporated many of the Native building methods–below-ground, south-facing etc. in order to conserve heat in winter and ward off heat in the summer…I’m sure you could learn lots from their website.

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