DIGNITY AND JUSTICE: UNPACKING IMMIGRATION LAW

Here’s how this week’s arts and culture piece begins:

Linda Dakin-Grimm grew up Catholic, first in Riverside, then in Portland, Oregon. In college, she moved away from the faith, then became an attorney and for decades worked as a trial lawyer in high-stakes business litigation. She was partner in a prestigious firm, with offices in LA, where she makes her home, and New York.

She was at the top of her game. She could look forward to ten more lucrative years before retirement.

It was then that the call came. Without much understanding why, she found herself drawn back to Mass and prayer.

“Wake up!” she heard. “I took more seriously my obligation to listen. What was the Lord asking me to do at this point in my life?”  She started “reading like crazy—all the Thomas Merton books. Philosophy, theology, social justice.”

The news at the time reported on the ‘surge’ of unaccompanied minors at the Southern border. She happened to be on the pastoral council at her parish.

“A guy came into our monthly meeting and said they were trying to figure out how to help these kids. And none of us knew anything. We had no idea how to help. So he just left. That made me feel uncomfortable. We’re sitting in this kind of rich white people’s parish by the beach and we don’t know a single thing about how to help these kids. That bothered me.”

READ THE WHOLE PIECE HERE.

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